COVID-19, Hyperglycemia, and New-Onset Diabetes


Posted: 2021-10-09 19:00:00
Diabetes Care . 2021 Oct 8;dc211318. doi: 10.2337/dc21-1318. Online ahead of print. Affiliations Expand Affiliations 1 Diabetes Research Centre, University Hospitals of Leicester NHS Trust, Leicester General Hospital, Leicester, U.K. kk22@leicester.ac.uk. 2 Section of Diabetes, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, University of Pisa, Pisa, Italy. 3 Laboratory for Clinical and Experimental Endocrinology, Department of Chronic Diseases and Metabolism, KU Leuven, Leuven, Belgium. 4 VA Puget Sound Health Care System and University of Washington, Seattle, WA. 5 Joslin Diabetes Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA. 6 Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism, University of North Carolina School of Medicine, Chapel Hill, NC. Item in Clipboard Kamlesh Khunti et al. Diabetes Care. 2021. Show details Display options Display options Format Diabetes Care . 2021 Oct 8;dc211318. doi: 10.2337/dc21-1318. Online ahead of print. Affiliations 1 Diabetes Research Centre, University Hospitals of Leicester NHS Trust, Leicester General Hospital, Leicester, U.K. kk22@leicester.ac.uk. 2 Section of Diabetes, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, University of Pisa, Pisa, Italy. 3 Laboratory for Clinical and Experimental Endocrinology, Department of Chronic Diseases and Metabolism, KU Leuven, Leuven, Belgium. 4 VA Puget Sound Health Care System and University of Washington, Seattle, WA. 5 Joslin Diabetes Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA. 6 Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism, University of North Carolina School of Medicine, Chapel Hill, NC. Item in Clipboard CiteDisplay options Display options Format Abstract Certain chronic comorbidities, including diabetes, are highly prevalent in people with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) and are associated with an increased risk of severe COVID-19 and mortality. Mild glucose elevations are also common in COVID-19 patients and associated with worse outcomes even in people without diabetes. Several studies have recently reported new-onset diabetes associated with COVID-19. The phenomenon of new-onset diabetes following admission to the hospital has been observed previously with other viral infections and acute illnesses. The precise mechanisms for new-onset diabetes in people with COVID-19 are not known, but it is likely that a number of complex interrelated processes are involved, including previously undiagnosed diabetes, stress hyperglycemia, steroid-induced hyperglycemia, and direct or indirect effects of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) on the β-cell. There is an urgent need for research to help guide management pathways for these patients. In view of increased mortality in people with new-onset diabetes, hospital protocols should include efforts to recognize and manage acute hyperglycemia, including diabetic ketoacidosis, in people admitted to the hospital. Whether new-onset diabetes is likely to remain permanent is not known, as the long-term follow-up of these patients is limited. Prospective studies of metabolism in the setting of postacute COVID-19 will be required to understand the etiology, prognosis, and treatment opportunities. © 2021 by the American Diabetes Association. [x] Cite Copy Format: Send To [x]

参考サイト PubMed: covid-19


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バイオクイックニュース日本語版:COVID-19特集

バイオクイックニュース日本語版
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